Detroit Photographer

Pricing - Detroit Photographer

Production Level:
Photos Per Day:
Photography Use:
Copyright Purchase:
Assistant(s):
Production Team:
Equipment/Rentals:
Post Production:



In the digital age per image pricing makes more sense than day rates for commercial, marketing and advertising photographers. Some event and family photographers have adopted this pricing strategy. However, event photography tends to be the exception and works well both hourly and per image depending on the situation. Use the above simple tool as a starting point to price your project photographs by placing the value of the photograph on your image, not your time. Event photography estimates can be calculated using 50-2000 imagee.   Below are explanations for each of the menus. For more information on pricing for photographers, check out this article. Use the Per Image Price button to calculate your prices. You may adjust your prices and recalculate by pressing any button. We will often use this number for the first image and give a discount on additional images purchased (i.e. $425 for the first image and $350 for each additional).

  • Expenses:  The first thing you need to do is understand your expenses and income goal. How much does it cost you to run your photography business? Add up all of your expenses: Equipment, rent, insurances, gas, supplies ... everything. Then add on top how much you wish to make each year. Add it together and then divide the total by the number of assignments or days of work you completed last year. If you don't know use 50 or 25 if this is your first year in business. Use the calculator above and select one photo per day (not the default - 1 photo hour), select local use and leave the copyright purchase in default position. Then test production levels until the per image price is more than your expenses and income goal  calculation. Use that level until your are ready for a raise :-).

  • Production Level: Every photographer works at a different production level. The cost to create and the value of a photograph is different for every photographer. If your work is for personal use the commercial value is different from a semi-pro to selling images to a local business. Chances are the semi-pro equipment, experience and expenses cost more.  You don't need to take the menu literally. If the per image price result seems a little too low or too high for your niche, community or location -- then try a different production level until you find the best combination for you.  Over time, you may adjust your production starting point.


  • Photos Per Day: The default position is 10 photographs per day or 1 photograph per hour based on a 10 hour day. If you want to know a value of one photograph with an average shooting time of about one hour, do not select any options on the photos per day menu.


  • Photography Use: The value of a photograph is different based on its use.  A photograph taken for a local shop doesn't have the same value as photographs for a major national campaign.  The first part of the menu is based on geography.  The second is for images only used on the web. We also offer the option to base the use image value on website traffic. Note: uv stands for Unique Visitors to a website over the period of one month.


  • Copyright Purchase: We don't recommend you sell your copyright.  The only good reason someone needs your copyright is so they can resell your image. If a client insists on owning the copyright, they should pay for that privilege.  Add a premium to the purchase of your photography using this menu. Do not select if the client is not purchasing your copyright.


  • We recommend you line-item your fixed expenses.  You may use options in red as labeled or any way that fits your production and work follow.  Your expense total is displayed as well as a per-image-pricing that includes your expenses.

  • Assistant: Many photographers use assistants to carry equipment, adjust lighting and help the assignment run smoother.


  • Production Team: A production team may include producers, stylists and tech support.


  • Equipment/Rentals: Use this option for your equipment, set materials, rental equipment and fees.


  • Post Production: Don't forget about the time and expense of working with and editing your photographs after the assignment.  The production level fee does include simple post-production, but if your post production is intensive and requires a lot of time and labor, consider adding additional fees for your assignments.